12 days of supply teaching with teachweb

On the 1st day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

The most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On the 2nd day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

An easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On the 3rd day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

An ultra fast application process, an easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On the 4th day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

A loyal, friendly consultant, an ultra fast application process, an easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On the 5th day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

A CV that gets me noticed, a loyal, friendly consultant, an ultra fast application process, an easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On 6th day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

Sound interview advice, a CV that gets me noticed, a loyal, friendly consultant, an ultra fast application process, an easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On 7th day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

Tips for getting references, sound interview advice, a CV that gets me noticed, a loyal, friendly consultant, an ultra fast application process, an easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On 8th day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

Supply teaching kit advice, tips for getting references, sound interview advice, a CV that gets me noticed, a loyal, friendly consultant, an ultra fast application process, an easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On 9th day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

Tips for managing my supply teaching day, supply teaching kit advice, tips for getting references, sound interview advice, a CV that gets me noticed, a loyal, friendly consultant, an ultra fast application process, an easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On 10th day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

Tips and advice from fellow supply teachers, tips for managing my supply teaching day, supply teaching kit advice, tips for getting references, sound interview advice, a CV that gets me noticed, a loyal, friendly consultant, an ultra fast application process, an easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On 11th day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

Alerts about long term and daily secondary supply teaching jobs, tips and advice from fellow supply teachers, tips for managing my supply teaching day, supply teaching kit advice, tips for getting references, sound interview advice, a CV that gets me noticed, a loyal, friendly consultant, an ultra fast application process, an easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

On 12th day of Christmas, Teachweb gave to me

My ideal supply teaching job, alerts about long term and daily secondary supply teaching jobs, tips and advice from fellow supply teachers, tips for managing my supply teaching day, supply teaching kit advice, tips for getting references, sound interview advice, a CV that gets me noticed, a loyal, friendly consultant,an ultra fast application process, an easy job finding service and the most generous rates of any teaching agency.

All the staff at teachweb wish you a very merry Christmas and a prosperous new year.

Rick Smallwood, Founder teachweb supply teaching agency
Rick Smallwood, founder, teachweb

 About the author: Rick Smallwood is a former chemistry teacher and founder of leading London and the South East supply teacher agency teachweb. He has a proven track record of matching the right teachers to the right vacancy.

supply teaching interviewsDo you get nervous at interviews? Don’t worry. In this, the last in our 4 part series about ‘How to win your ideal supply teaching job’, we have gathered together some tips to help you to leave a positive lasting impression at supply teaching interviews.

1. What’s in it for me?

Remember that this is also an opportunity for you to find out what the school can do for you. So prepare a list of at least 5 questions to ask the interviewer.

2. Do your research

Fail to plan. Plan to fail as they say. Get as much background information as you can about the school. Ask you supply teaching agency to brief you about your interviewers and the department you will be working for.

3. Rehearse your answers

Ask your supply-teaching agency to provide you with a list of the most common interview questions. Be confident in the knowledge that your supply teaching agency has heard them all. Rehearse your answers prior to your interview.

4. Demonstrate your experiences

Demonstrate how you have been able to learn from both good and bad teaching experiences. Have examples at hand.

5. Show you can add value to the school

Talk about interests and passions that could add value to school activities and initiatives. For example if you are a DT teacher who is interested in radio controlled cars, your school would be delighted if you could help out at the RC car club.

4. Exude confidence

Do use positive body language and voice. Take a look at this blog for tips about mastering body language to your advantage.

5. Look the part

Do dress appropriately and in a way that gives you confidence.

Finally, relax and try to enjoy it. Remember you will learn from every interview you attend.

Rick Smallwood, Founder teachweb supply teaching agency
Rick Smallwood, founder, teachweb

 About the author: Rick Smallwood is a former chemistry teacher and founder of leading London and the South East supply teacher agency teachweb. He has a proven track record of matching the right teachers to the right vacancy.

succeeding at observed interview lessonsCongratulations! Your CV has got you through the school’s front door. Now you need to demonstrate your skills, experience and personality. Here are some tips to help you to shine during your observed interview lesson.

How to succeed in an observed interview lesson

1.   Make yourself aware of latest Ofsted lesson criteria and use it

Know that Ofsted is keen for teachers to:

  • Conduct mini plenaries. Show students understand topics taught and demonstrate you are on top of how learning is progressing.
  • Incorporate group tasks into a lesson, as opposed to just teacher led tasks.

2.  Learn and use some of your students’ names

Show the school you are keen to get to know and build good relationships with your students.

3.  Make sure you can fit into your lesson all you have planned

Keep your lesson plan simple. At this point your school is looking to find out how you introduce topics, engage your class, teach the topics and assess your class’s understanding of what you have taught.

4.   Make sure you acknowledge student’s good behaviour

One of the most effective ways to promote the display of good behaviour by a class is to reward those who demonstrate it.

5.   Make sure you address low-level class disturbance

Your message needs to be simple, clear and non-negotiable.

6.   Make sure you follow your school’s behaviour for learning policy

Showing that you have done your homework and are keen to fit in from the start will earn you extra brownie points.

7.   Try to match differentiation and pacing to your class

Always have a plan up your sleeve in case students race through your lessons.

We hope you have found this post useful and welcome your comments.

Look out for the last part of our How to win your ideal supply teaching job series, when we provide you with advice for succeeding at interviews.

Until next time:

Rick Smallwood, Founder teachweb supply teaching agency
Rick Smallwood, founder, teachweb

 About the author: Rick Smallwood is a former chemistry teacher and founder of leading London and the South East supply teacher agency teachweb. He has a proven track record of matching the right teachers to the right vacancy.

supply teachers and bands. What they have in commonIn my day job I am a supply teaching recruitment consultant. Yet last night, ‘Matthew’ I was a rock star.

I should explain. Earlier this year I joined a new band. Last week we performed our first gig.

It was both nerve racking and thrilling. Indeed it reminded me of what it was like to stand up in front of a new class for the first time.

Following the gig and our debrief, I started thinking about what new supply teachers can do to minimise the uncertainty and maximise the things they can control to reduce their stress levels. Here are 3 strategies I came up with:

Hit the ground running with unfamiliar equipment

When we arrived to perform our first gig, my band found itself sharing equipment left by the previous band. I needed to be able to pick up where the last band had left off and hit the ground running.

Similarly supply teachers have to pick up where previous teachers left off. Therefore I recommend supply teachers prepare themselves to be not too reliant on specific pieces of teaching kit. In fact supply teachers should prepare themselves for the unexpected.

Coping with nerves

This first gig I performed with my new band was the first gig I had performed in front of a live audience in over 20 years. I have to admit I got really nervous.

However this was when my teaching experience came in handy. I understood that my nerves were actually a positive thing as they helped me to keep alert.

Try to enjoy the teaching experience. Our previous post on using body language to your advantage may also help you.

Laying the stage

When my band rehearses we are able to stand in a formation that enables us to look at one another and to give each other cues. When we took our positions in front of our audience, I realised we couldn’t do this. This threw me somewhat. As a result I realised the importance of rehearsing in full gig configuration.

It’s the same with teaching a new class. Rehearse your lesson plans. Make sure you know them inside out. Knowing your material inside and out will ensure whatever the layout/size of the classroom, you will feel comfortable.

So you see, supply teachers can learn a lot from new pop bands. Ultimately the success of both comes down to practice. I hope you enjoyed this post and would welcome your comments.

Rick Smallwood, Founder teachweb supply teaching agency
Rick Smallwood, founder, teachweb

 About the author: Rick Smallwood is a former chemistry teacher and founder of leading London and the South East supply teacher agency teachweb. He has a proven track record of matching the right teachers to the right vacancy.

Teaching referencesDo you know what your teaching references will say about you?

Don’t leave obtaining teaching references to chance. If you are competing for a position, they could mean the difference between you getting the supply-teaching job or not.

In part one of our ‘How to win your ideal supply teaching job’ series, we gave you advice about How to create a winning supply teaching CV.

In this, part two of our series; we have compiled some greats tips for making sure your references serve you well:

  1. Choose your references carefully. Make sure your referees will provide the most positive impression of you.
  2. Make sure referees are not surprised to be contacted about you. Choose to obtain teaching references from your most recent long-term roles.
  3. In fact, stay in touch with your referees. Thank them for providing references, regardless of the outcome. This will encourage them to talk about you in a positive light in the future.
  4. Brief your referees to sell the specifics that connect you to the type of teaching position you seek. Offer a list of characteristics you believe will support your application.
  5. Supply teaching is fast moving. Try to use referees who are organised and will respond quickly to email contact.
  6. Make it easy for your supply teaching recruitment consultant. Keep your contact information up to date.

And finally be honest about any problems you may have experienced in the past. It pays to get your supply teaching recruitment consultant on YOUR side.

Have you got any tips you can share about how you managed to secure the best supply teaching jobs? We would love to hear them.

And look out for next week’s post. It will provide you with vital tips for teaching an observed lesson.

Rick Smallwood, Founder teachweb supply teaching agency
Rick Smallwood, founder, teachweb

 About the author: Rick Smallwood is a former chemistry teacher and founder of leading London and the South East supply teacher agency teachweb. He has a proven track record of matching the right teachers to the right vacancy.